dis/lit

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ESA Conference 2012

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Written by cfoss

March 7th, 2012 at 8:02 pm

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620. Autism/Text

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Saturday, 8 January, 5:15 – 6:30 p.m., Atrium I, J. W. Marriott

 1. “Literary Autism by Literary Autistics: Beyond the Destructive Presumption and Paternalism of Neurotypicals,” Ralph James Savarese, Grinnell Coll.

Savarese

2.  “Reading in Pictures: Re-visioning Autism and Literature through the Medium of Manga,” Chris Foss, Univ. of Mary Washington

Foss (Long Version)  [This is the 18-pg. version, from which I will excerpt my 20-min. presentation

3.  “Autistic Aloneness and Social Space: Robinson Crusoe and Narrative Architecture,” Julia Miele Rodas, Bronx Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

Rodas

Rodas handout

Rodas PowerPoint slides

Written by cfoss

January 1st, 2011 at 11:47 pm

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Masters in Education

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I talked to my older sister this afternoon about this semester and the books on my syllabi and whatnot, and while I was going over some of my favorites, she informed me that her masters in education program at GMU is also reading Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. She said her program loves the book and that they’ve been having frequent rich conversations about autistic narratives and the adolescent literature genre. I was very pleased– I directed her to our blog! Good luck this week guys!

Written by Matthew

December 6th, 2010 at 1:11 am

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dis/media

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in case anybody’s interested at this late stage in the game, here’s a link to some short blog posts on disability in the media

Written by cfoss

December 1st, 2010 at 5:07 pm

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One more message from Keith Banner

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“All of this took me by surprise. Obviously I appreciate your work… I’m going to be teaching a disaiblities studies class at Miami U here in Ohio next fall, and I definitely will be talking about your work, and the work of the others in your class. Inspiring! Keith”

I think this is a testament to how much effort we’ve put into this blog, and I think we should be proud of what we’ve accomplished as a class.

A side note, has anyone else noticed how high up on Google searches this blog comes up when you type in a title of one of our readings + disability studies?

Written by gormanda

December 1st, 2010 at 2:15 pm

Amazing gift

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We have all know that those with an autism are sometimes limited to certain activities and tend to be pushed out of social groups for there differences. Hikaru does not do things like others do. He has been significantly different his entire life from birth. He really does not like change but to me that is a characteristic of many people who are not autistic. What is amazing about people with autism is that we sometimes concentrate so much on their disability that we automatically assume they are incapable of doing anything. In Hiharu’s case, he can cook. I think that is amazing because people who have no disabilities cant even boil water. I just think that it is time for society to stop underestimating the abilities of those who we deem disabled.

Written by mayallday

December 1st, 2010 at 12:35 am

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abstract foss

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Here is the abstract for my upcoming conference paper presentation on With the Light; I’m counting on you all to help me out!

In his paper “Reading in Pictures: Re-visioning Autism and Literature through Keiko Tobe’s With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child,” Chris Foss argues that Tobe’s multi-volume manga series is a crucial set of texts for any (re)consideration of literary autism.  Building off of the work of Donald Ault and W. J. T. Mitchell, Foss insists that one particular function of the “imagetext” these manga stories embody is the foregrounding of multiple discursive codes and of the multiple sensory and cognitive modes required to mediate them.  This sort of dialectical reading experience (one which highlights the imbrication of verbal and visual experiences, as well as the range of possibilities for disjunctive and/or synthetic relationships between them) encourages a broadening of one’s understanding of/approach to both autism and literature from the standpoint of form in much the same way that Savarese suggests the poetic language of Baggs and Mukhopadhyay opens up a more comprehensive conception of literary autism by literary autistics.  Indeed, according to Foss, attentiveness not only to the interplay of narrative and graphic elements but even more so to all the various components of the visual gestalt (abstract background effects, bleeds, captions, motion lines, panel shapes/sizes, sound effects, speech balloons, splash pages, symbolia, etc.)—including the particular iconography unique to manga, which employs set artistic conventions (including facial features and other character design traits) to express emotions or communicate internal character states—ultimately allows for a more complex, heterogeneous, and interactive literary experience of autism.

Written by cfoss

November 29th, 2010 at 11:02 pm

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where did the major papers/projects go?

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click here, or on the page link for major papers/projects in the top right corner of the blog

Written by cfoss

November 29th, 2010 at 1:41 pm

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[kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.youtube.com/v/UBmb1vsjzDA ” width=”425″ height=”350″ wmode=”transparent” /]

The Dr. Who Christmas special this is is “A Christmas Carol.”

The tagline would make Dr. Foss happy:

“(Christmas)Time can be rewritten.”

Written by Robert

November 19th, 2010 at 7:51 pm

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Tagged with ,

CoPo Post

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Hey guys, those of you who are also in CoPo already know this, but I shared the link of the interview between Tito Rajarshi Mukhopadhyay and Grinnell College’s Ralph Savarese with the Contemporary Poetry blog seeing as it talks a great deal about poetry and the writing process. Here’s the response I got: (She includes one of her son’s “chants,” or spoken poetry.)

Matt,
Thank you so much for this tidbit of unexpected diversion, when I was trying really hard to stay on task and get some assignments completed. That said, this is absolutely mesmerizing and so on target; I absolutely would not have missed it for the world. It is quite interesting to consider how the deconstruction and synthesization of sensory input lends itself to poetry and the arts in general. The unique thought processes and patterning of autism would, in fact, almost seem to lend themselves to poetry.

I do wonder, though, how this compares and justifies with research that indicates that the incidence of autism is much higher in families where, both parents are highly educated in mathematics and science, compared to the incidence in parents who trend toward the humanities. Perhaps, in some milder cases, parents who trend toward the humanities simply do not notice any peculiarities in their child’s thought processes. This does lead to the question, what is unusual, what is a disability and who decides what is normal or that a particular way of thinking, perceiving or behaving is somehow wrong or odd. Is not uniqueness what makes this world beautiful?

As you may know, my son, Justin, has been diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder. He is constantly coming up with odd comparisons and metaphors, many of which are quite poetic. Because of his love of poetry, and his penchant to speak in rhythmic tones, I have always felt that he might someday make a good poet. He often chants things, some seem very repetitive like he is, as Tito says, “lost in a labyrinth” of some small minute detail, and at other times he personifies objects in unique ways. I transcribed this from one of his chants about a year ago (when he was nine).

Tick-tock, the clock is broken.
Bing-bong, it’s got the wrong voice chip in it.
The glass is broken; the hands are bent.
It’s about to rain; the clock will be ruined.

Clock hands!
Clock glass!
Off with the hands!
Off with the face!
There it’s fixed.

But what time does it tell?
The clock knows.
Now I’m the clock; tick-tock;
I tell what time it is when it snows.

Written by Matthew

November 19th, 2010 at 12:27 pm

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