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Katherine’s Final Exam: The Refreshingly Truthful and Informative Presentation of Autism within Keiko Tobe’s “With the Light: Raising and Autistic Child – Volume 6”

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Keiko Tobe unapologetically presents autism as one valuable point on the spectrum of human experience.  In her graphic text, With the Light: Raising and Autistic Child – Volume 6, Tobe asserts and demonstrates that autism is not a “curable disease” from which someone “suffers,” but a set of characteristics that form how an individual experiences the world.  Tobe also risks the validity of her text as a whole by offering support and information directly to her audience, not just by implying advice through her characters.  Further, this presentation of autism, in some ways atypical, in other ways emotionally truthful, roots this text firmly within the canon of disability studies in that it offers a unique, truthful, life-like gaze into the tensions and epiphanies of a family who is raising an autistic child.

Tobe creates a believable space within this family by offering the same tensions found in the real world: acceptance against rejection, understanding against ignorance, and hope against doubt.  For example, in juxtaposition against her mother-in-law, Sachiko does not try to change Hikaru’s behaviors or ignore them. Instead, Sachiko accepts Hikaru exactly the way he is, and learns to adapt to how Hikaru experiences his world instead of trying to destroy it.  Although Sachiko does occasionally wonder what life would be like if Hikaru did not have autism, this detail of the text only adds to the multi-dimensional reality of the family.  After witnessing how Sachiko and Masato have learned to adapt themselves to Hikaru’s world, the mother-in-law begins to see that Hikaru is not as “far way” as she had assumed.  These tensions are made even more believable as they are selectively resolved or reinforced in both the familial home, as well as the public setting.

On a more raw, functional level, this text even (possibly only in the English translation) offers tips and reassuring notes to parents and families caring for autistic individuals.  In any other text that takes the form of a graphic novel, this bold risk would completely break the “third wall” between the world of the characters, and the reality of the audience.  Interestingly, this detail only serves to add to the richness of this text.  One of these little notes can be seen on page 444, in a footnote, where Tobe directly addresses the reader and offers them more information about how to acquire earmuffs to help autistic individuals concentrate.  Within the genres of graphic novel and manga, it is remarkably rare for the author to purposefully break this “third wall,” and may even be seen as a flaw in some texts if done by accident; but Tobe’s purposefulness adds to the truthful functionality of this text: not only to give emotions and situations to identify with, but to also inform and act as a resource.

The view of autism found within Keiko Tobe’s With the Light is both highly realistic, and inspiringly optimistic, in that every detail of its presentation functions to form a unified text that may serve as a beacon of light within the dark, conflicted halls of autistic studies.  The family dynamics and genuine acceptance found within this text can serve as a guiding light for families of autistic individuals and those studying autistic theory.

Word count:  547

Written by Katherine Sullivan

December 8th, 2010 at 11:28 am

Finally, The Final Project of Sam, Kathleen, Allison, Sarah, and Katherine: “The Sound of Tomorrow”

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What started as a sequel to William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, became a more informed, modernized tale inspired by the Compson family.  This project is an attempt to apply current disability theory to the stereotypically dysfunctional family. Within this piece, we ask  the question:  How does the Compson family complicate our ambiguous definition of disability?  Split into five narratives that all take place within a short period of time (no more than a couple weeks), we hope to provide a level of depth to these characters to at least provoke introspection about how we see disability and how it effects our everyday lives.

Finally, we hope you enjoy what has turned into a (very) short novella: “The Sound of Tomorrow”

Benjy Compson

Quentin Compson

Candace Compson

Jason Compson

Appendix

Written by Katherine Sullivan

November 29th, 2010 at 12:27 pm

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